Travelers can volunteer to keep Tenorio Volcano National Park clean

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If there's one thing that Costa Rica has become known for in recent years, it's the country's considerable effort to conserve its natural resources, lands and animals. A quarter of the country is federally protected land, and despite the area's reputation as a popular destination for international travelers, Costa Rica's jungles remain largely untouched by the hand of man. Caring travelers hoping to make a difference while visiting the Central American nation can actually be a part of the conservation efforts, by volunteering to help protect well traveled locales like Tenorio Volcano National Park.

Located within the Arenal Tilaran Conservation Area and a drive from cities like Liberia and Cañas, Tenorio Volcano National Park is a sizable public holding boasting 129 square kilometers of rain- and cloud forest, as well as four volcanic peaks. The park also features two sizable volcanic craters, with one large enough to be referred to as a volcano itself (Montezuma).

Rio Celeste

While numerous eco tourists head to Tenorio every year to view the beautiful foliage, thermal springs and geysers that run throughout the area, the key attraction to the park is the stunning Rio Celeste, a beautiful and winding river that has turned a shade of turquoise blue due to the presence of both sulfur and calcium carbonate

Volunteering at Tenorio

As one might suspect, maintaining a lush and natural environment of this size and magnitude can take a lot of work, and, over the years, the Costa Rican government has found that volunteers from colleges, conservation tours and other eco-conscious travelers are an excellent way to keep the park looking beautiful and pristine without breaking the government's limited budget.

Over the past nine years, conservation groups like the Heliconias Project has developed relationships with colleges and tourism providers that have included everything from mapping and constructing new trails, maintaining plant life in the wild, sustainable gardening in greenhouses and more. Volunteers also have the chance to see some of the native wildlife of Tenorio Volcano National Park up close and personal thanks to conservation efforts focused at some of the rarer species in the country like the tapir, various types of sloth and the jaguar.

Volunteering is an excellent way for eco travelers to gain a more intimate and deep understanding of the region around them while helping the country of Costa Rica maintain its beauteous natural resources for years to come.
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